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Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)
a scriptures to unite or divide? author and professor of religion at boston university, steven, joins us. president obama, act two, the president calling for unity, but hitting at divisive liberalism. what will the republicans do? congressman gomert joins us. progressive claims. this is flo. i need you. i feel so alone. but you're not alone. i knew you'd come. like i could stay away. you know i can't do this without you. you'll never have to. you're always there for me. shh! i'll get you a rental car. i could also use an umbrella. fall in love with progressive's claims service. lou: house republicans trying to pressure senate democrats to pass a budget. for the first time in almost four years. now, the republicans have up vailed a bill to suspend the debt limit with a vote set for as early as wednesday. details of that legislation include this -- suspension of the debt ceiling for three months. on the 19th of may, the debt limit increases from $16.4 trillion to accommodate addional raring the treasury requires r and bills withholes the pay of lawmakers if congress fails to pass a budget
. scattered throughout american history. >> have presidents invoked religion in their addresses, always? >> every president has invoked god or a deity in general, but not very specifically. none has actually mentioned jesus christ, four have invoked christianity. also uneven. >> has religion become more or less important over time in inaugural addresses? >> looking into the subject, i'm surprise s surprised to see the turning point came with fdr. first to have an invocation and benediction, the first to go to church on inauguration day. those things tradition nous are only as old as the 1930s and '40s. of t >> the significance of president obama using you dr. king's bible cannot be downplayed. >> we have seen the tradition with abraham lincoln and martin luther king. you think of dr. king's phrase, the moral arc of the universe is long but it dips toward justice. i think president obama is trying to to be part of that arc. >> thank you very much. good stuff, ed ayers. as i said, could i sit here around talk to you all day. thank you. appreciate it. >> my pleasure. >>> president barack o
. religion of high pressure in control, setting us up for nice conditions. a little bit of activity over the upper great lakes, as we see winter precipitation there. here at home, things are still calm and a little on the cooler side, but overall, things will be quite different compared to today and tomorrow than they will be moving into inauguration day. for tonight, mostly clear to partly cloudy skies overall. we've got a frontal system to keep an eye on. this religion of high pressure is going to dive through and to the south. the first front, one of two, our weather makers. this one's going to move through into tomorrow. so cold front heads through tomorrow that's going to set the stage for the long-term forecast in the beginning of the week and for holiday monday. that's the second frontal system behind it that's going to bring in a shot of very, very cold arctic air. tomorrow, we're looking at mostly sunny skies. we've got one more day where it's fairly comfortable before the arctic air arrives. once it does, the chill is really going to set in. temperatures well below seasonal, an
of question about what religion he is. this is what makes it so hard for me to watch this. i think today, i am is going to clean out the attic instead of watching the inauguration. host: and that is chris in bedford, virginia. live pictures of the national mall as it fills in. 800,000 people are estimated to be here for president obama's second inaugural. that shot you see now is to give the capital. the white in the front, a friend of the mid-screen, those are seats. i guess those are reserved, so you do not have to get down there too early. the people that you see there are standing. there is a lot of standing going on, a lot of standing areas. people arrive several hours early, get through security, and wait for the events, and then join the parade. in a "usa today" this morning is this map that shows where some of the main areas of the events are taking place. here is the capital. here is the white house. the parade route will go, and here is the reviewing stand right in front of the white house here. there's a the two main places. but the third place that will get a lot of attention, were
not -- this is the supreme law of the land religion is part of me but it's not what i'm going to go to. he is not rick sanatorium he is a religious man. >> jennifer: sure, i get that. you are a performer. i'm curious what you thought about the performance of day, the delivery of this. normally you start a big speech with a couple of jokes. but you don't do that with the inauguration. >> not one president has ever told a joke in their inauguration. they tell jokes at the conventions, campaign trail, state of the union, even debates -- >> jennifer: it's so solemn. >> open a joke with what are all of you people doing my backyard something? [ laughter ] >> but i think president obama is savoring looking back at the crowd, that is human to me. he is a human being like all of us. >> jennifer: so this was also a -- these inaugural speeches some have been very brief, some very been very long. this was was 18 minutes. was it about the right length? >> i think so. jerry nabb the congressman from new york looks like he is falling asleep over and over. >> jennifer: yeah, we have his youngest d
and state governments to discriminate based on color, sex, or religion. dr. king's mission brought him to selma, alabama in 1965. he attempted to lead a march to the state's capitol, but mob and police violence forced them to stop. that day became known as bloody sunday. >> somewhere i read of the freedom of speech. somewhere i read of the freedom of press. somewhere i read that the greatness of america is the right to protest for rights. >> mike: dr. king protested until the day he died by an assassin's bullet in memphis. his voice may have been silenced, but his message lives on 45 years later. joining us now from atlanta is dr. martin luther king, jr.'s niece, my good friend alvita king. >> hello, governor huckabee. it's good to be here and to the audience, hello. >> mike: well, you know, when i hear the words of your uncle, i am deeply, emotionally moved because i remember in my lifetime i've seen this incredible change in our country because of his dream and his willingness to put his life on the line to see it happen. as a member of the family, i want you to speak to, as you see
it illegal for federal and state governments to discriminate based on color, sex, or religion. dr. king's mission brought him to selma, alabama in 1965. he attempted to lead a march to the state's capitol, but mob and police violence forced them to stop. that day became known as bloody sunday. >> somewhere i read of the freedom of speech. somewhere i read of the freedom of press. somewhere i read that the greatness of america is the right to protest for rights. >> mike: dr. king protested until the day he died by an assassin's bullet in memphis. his voice may have been silenced, but his message lives on 45 years later. joining us now from atlanta is dr. martin luther king, jr.'s niece, my good friend alvita king. >> hello, governor huckabee. it's good to be here and to the audience, hello. >> mike: well, you know, when i hear the words of your uncle, i am deeply, emotionally moved because i remember in my lifetime i've seen this incredible change in our country because of his dream and his willingness to put his life on the line to see it happen. as a member of the family, i want you to
in those da y when given the -- between franco and the vatican, which made serviery other religion illegal begin that chapter with a funny stormed i am in a bar in northen spain and the guys are trying to teach me how to pour the wonderful cider, the hard cider which perhaps you know -- you hold the bottle this wg your head, you have a glass with a very big opened last pointing out and the cider is supposed to hit the outside and bounce in and iite trying to do that and most of it is running down my pants all over the floor. little bit is going into the glass and one of the guys sa y to me -ke twe are pretty well drunk by this time and one of the unn y sg catholic or atheist? those seemed to be the only possibilities. i said no, i am neither a catholic nor an atheist. no kidding? you must be protestant. why would you think that? servierybody an american governt -- that is not true either. john kennedy -- so i said, what are you? i am jewish. you couldn't be jewish. he ghy couldn't i be it? r aou don't have any horns. i joked, i said i had some cut off when i came into the ford yn service.
makes religion into an instrument of hatred like j.b. stoner, there are plenty of those. they are near the top of the list. c-span: here is the book. second in the three volume series by taylor branch. this one is called "pillar of fire america in the king years 1963-1965." thank you. >> guest: thank you, brian. >>> you are watching book tv on c-span2. tonight we are at the national press club in washington, d.c. for their annual authors night and we are pleased to be joined here by robert merry who is the author of "where they stand the american presidents in the eyes of voters and historians." mr. merry, do we tend to like our presidents? >> i think the american people love their presidents. they love the presidency. but when they have a president that has not succeeded to the judge a failure, they vary on sentimentally cast them aside and that is our system to read that is what they were invited to do by the founders and by the constitution. >> do we have a short patience? >> we understand the constitution gave them hiring and firing authority over these guys every four years. so th
civic religion. radical still in much of the world but seemingly ordinary people can govern themselves. if we can't all agree on that and celebrate that, at least once every four years then there's something wrong with our culture >> brown: we have music. we have poetry. we got everything. >> everything, everything, wonderful >> and inclusiveness. that was the theme from beginning to end. people who often had been left out. were included. >> brown: all right. richard north and smith, annette gordon reed and beverly gauge, thank you all three >> thank you. >> ifill: and for the other news of this day, we turn to hari sreenivasan. >> sreenivasan: there was word today that three americans died in the hostage stand-off in algeria that finally ended over the weekend. a u.s. official told the associated press that seven other americans escaped. it started wednesday when islamist militants linked to al- qaeda attacked a natural gas complex near the libyan border. algerian special forces then launched a series of operations to retake the site. today the prime minister gave his first official d
protects the people's rights of freedom of speech, freedom of press, free exercise of religion, free trade agreement of association and all other such rights of the people. my second amendment advances the fundamental principle of political equality for all by empowering congress and the states the right to regulate political spending. it will allow congress to pass campaign finance reform legislation that will withstand constitutional challenges. mr. speaker, we need to empower people, not corporations or big money special interests. our current system has been corrupted. it undermines the rights of ordinary citizens. it undermines our democracy. surely this is not the system our founders envisioned. the preamble to the constitution is we the people. let us hope that this congress doesn't forget that. i ask my colleagues to join me in supporting these important bills to reform our campaign finance laws and assure that corporate rights do not trumps people's rights. thank you. i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. t
inaugural was repairing, bind up the nation's wounds. he made multiple references to god and to religion and apropos that right now, myrlie evers-williams, the widow of medgar evers, who was slain 50 years ago in 1963 is giving the benediction for these ceremonies, and this is only the second time, by the way, that a presidential inauguration has taken place on martin luther king day. the first time, don, was when you were there in the white house in 1997 for president clinton. let's listen to miss williams. >> let us act upon the meaning that everyone is included. may the inherent dignity and inalienable rights of every woman, man, boy, and girl be honored. may all your people, especially the least of these, flourish in our blessed nation. 150 years after the emancipation proclamation and 50 years after the march on washington, we celebrate the spirit of our ancestors, which has allowed us to move from a nation of unborn hopes and a history of disinfranchised votes to today's expression of a more perfect union. we ask, too, almighty, that where our paths seem blanketed by thorns of oppr
. i am speaking of that force which all of the great religions have seen as the supreme unifying principle of life. love is somehow the key that unlocks the door which leads to ultimate reality. this hindu-muslim-christian- jewish-buddhist belief about ultimate reality is beautifully summed up in the first epistle of saint john: "let us love one another (yes), for love is god. (yes) and every one that loveth is born of god and knoweth god. he that loveth not knoweth not god, for god is love. if we love one another, god dwelleth in us and his love is perfected in us." let us hope that this spirit will become the order of the day. we can no longer afford to worship the god of hate or bow before the altar of retaliation. the oceans of history are made turbulent by the ever-rising tides of hate. history is cluttered with the wreckage of nations and individuals that pursued this self-defeating path of hate. as arnold toynbee says: "love is the ultimate force that makes for the saving choice of life and good against the damning choice of death and evil. therefore the first hope in our
for anything but you might have used on facebook. this could be due to religion, politics and schools. all this information can be easily searched by your friends. deserter bird talk about this a a press conferencezucker burke talked at this at the press conference. what we will do is that we will put us as an encouragement among on- screen so that way everyone will have a chance to look through the tools at to see what people will be able to find about them. >> facebook is trying to and voided a privacy controversy. they're trying to make it easy for users to alter their settings. when you see this privacy's sentencin setting talipot but yu should click on and go through. >> you could go to your face book privacy's settings and adjust your activity log perry e. use a remote any information that you do not want to be searchable. for the time being they have not integrated. you should go through your life wit \. facebook will use your likes and interest to do your results. people will be at a search for people who have lived in kansas or wore a democrat or maybe single. >> >> it is 9:27 a.m
where they can look at the blessing. >> i think that what's helping this family is their religion, their community. they're embedded in a community, and many people in this country are not. you know, there's been a tremendous loss of community and connections with people. so, you know, i would just say, you know, build up your community and your connections, because this kind of thing can happen to any one of us at any moment. >> salgo: i want to go back very quickly to this whole concept of complicated grief, or whatever you'd like to call it. there's this -- there's a list. extreme depression, focus on the loss, intense longing -- that just goes on, and you get stuck, i thinkwas the phrase that you used. if someone has these symptoms, what do you do about it? is there medical intervention that works? >> well, i think, first of all, all those symptoms are probably normal for a while. and what i really look at is, are they interfering with the person's functioning. otherwise, a lot of those things are normal and can continue for a long time. >> but i think when they're interfering
the barriers that separated those of different race and region and religion, and where there had been mistrust, built unity, with a respect for diversity, that we had found productive work for those able to perform it, that we had strengthened the american family, which is the basis of our society, that we had ensured respect for the law and equal treatment under the law, for the weak and the powerful, for the rich and the poor, and that we had enabled our people to be proud of their own government once again. i would hope that the nations of the world might say that we had built a lasting peace, based not on weapons of war but on international policies which reflect our own most precious values. these are not just my goals -- and they will not be my accomplishments, but the affirmation of our nation's continuing moral strength and our belief in an undiminished, ever-expanding american dream. thank you very much. >> here's for from the list of inauguration we found from the academy. polk was in 1845. buchanan inauguration was the first known to be photographed. during lincoln's second inaugura
Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)